IDBURY PRINTS

The linocut became a popular method of relief printing after Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse demonstrated its artistic possibilities. Linoleum itself was developed as a flooring material in order to provide work for the factories that used to make sails for sailing ships, after the arrival of steam. Its artistic possibilities were first spotted by the Austrian art educator Franz Cisek; we have a number of linocuts by pupils of Cisek, listed under his name. We also list stenocuts under the term linocut. Stenocuts are very similar, but instead of linoleum they are cut into sandblast stencil tape, a product used by monumental masons. This rubbery material is softer and thinner than linoleum, making it possible to create plates with shaped edges. The process was invented by the American artist Sue Anne Bottomley. We have stenocuts by Emma Bradford.

 
JAN BATTERMANN
Akt, 1957
Linocut
 
RUDOLF WIEMER
Akt, 1974
Linocut
 
RUDOLF WIEMER
Algen und Steine, 1974
Linocut
 
CLAUDE FLIGHT
All Hallows' E'en, 1936
Linocut
 
VALERIJONAS VYTAUTAS JUCYS
Angel (Ex libris Vyt. Jurksto), 1970
Linocut
 
CLAUDE FLIGHT
Anglo-Saxon Yuletide Feast, 1936
Linocut
 
JURGEN ZUMBRUNNEN
Apollo 11, 1969
Linocut
 
JURGEN ZUMBRUNNEN
Apollo 11 XXI.VII.MCMLXIX 3.56 MEZ, 1969
Linocut
 
PABLO PICASSO
Après la pique (After the lance), 1959
Linocut
 
OTTO FEIL
Augsburg, Ulrichmünster, 1969
Linocut
 
OTTO FEIL
Aus Krems a.d. Donau, 1969
Linocut
 
OTTO FEIL
Aus Krems, am Körnermarkt, 1969
Linocut

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