IDBURY PRINTS

Pochoir is a process of hand-stencilled colour, applied either to a black line lithograph or a line block. Developed initially as a way of reproducing watercolour drawings (a technique exploited brilliantly by artists such as André Dignimont), pochoir also proved ideally suited to the Art Deco style, with its masses of discrete colour. The fashion plates of magazines such as the Gazette du Bon Ton were reproduced by pochoir, and the great fashion illustrators such as Pierre Brissaud and Charles Martin also used the technique very effectively in other contexts. Fine artists were also quick to understand the possibilities of pochoir, among them Henri Matisse (in Jazz), Sonia Delaunay (in Prose du Transsibérien and Compositions, Couleurs, Idées), and André Lanskoy (in Cortège). We have a rare set of Delaunay's pochoir plates for Compositions, Couleurs, Idées, plus abstract compositions in pochoir by many leading Modernist painters. We also have a good selection of Art Deco and School of Paris pochoirs. The pochoir technique was perfected by Saudé; other masters of the art of applying pochoir colour were Charpentier and Renson. In England, the Curwen Press adapted the process by using transparent stencils.

 
SONIA DELAUNAY
Composition XXI, c.1930
Pochoir
 
SONIA DELAUNAY
Composition XXII, c.1930
Pochoir
 
SONIA DELAUNAY
Composition XXIII, c.1930
Pochoir
 
SONIA DELAUNAY
Composition XXIV, c.1930
Pochoir
 
SONIA DELAUNAY
Composition XXIX, c.1930
Pochoir
 
SONIA DELAUNAY
Composition XXV, c.1930
Pochoir
 
SONIA DELAUNAY
Composition XXVI, c.1930
Pochoir
 
SONIA DELAUNAY
Composition XXVII, c.1930
Pochoir
 
SONIA DELAUNAY
Composition XXX, c.1930
Pochoir
 
SONIA DELAUNAY
Composition XXXI, c.1930
Pochoir
 
SONIA DELAUNAY
Composition XXXII, c.1930
Pochoir
 
SONIA DELAUNAY
Composition XXXIII, c.1930
Pochoir [sold]

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